Burkitts lymphoma mnemonic




Hey everyone!
A quick “things to remember” about lymphoma mnemonic for tests!
(Follicular lymphoma mnemonic coming soon!)

Here are things to remember for Burkitts lymphoma:
- B cell lymphoma (B for Burkitts, B for B cells!)
- All types of Burkitt’s lymphoma are characterized by disregulation of the c-myc gene.
- Myc (c-Myc) is a regulator gene that codes for a nuclear transcription factor.
- The most common variant is t(8;14).

- The ”starry sky” appearance on histology
- It is due to scattered tingible body-laden macrophages (macrophages containing dead body of apoptotic tumor cells).


That’s all!
Lemme know if it helped =)
-IkaN

Burkitts lymphoma mnemonic

Hey everyone!
A quick “things to remember” about lymphoma mnemonic for tests!
(Follicular lymphoma mnemonic coming soon!)
Here are things to remember for Burkitts lymphoma:
- B cell lymphoma (B for Burkitts, B for B cells!)
- All types of Burkitt’s lymphoma are characterized by disregulation of the c-myc gene.
- Myc (c-Myc) is a regulator gene that codes for a nuclear transcription factor.
- The most common variant is t(8;14).
- The ”starry sky” appearance on histology
- It is due to scattered tingible body-laden macrophages (macrophages containing dead body of apoptotic tumor cells).
That’s all!
Lemme know if it helped =)
-IkaN

Plasmodium species that have a dormant liver form (hypnozoites) mnemonic

Hey everyone!

There are 4 Plasmodium species - P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax and P. ovale.

Did you know that P. vivax and P. ovale have a dormant stage (hypnozoites) that can persist in the liver? It can cause relapses by invading the bloodstream weeks, or even years later!

Primaquine is mainly used to treat P. vivax or P. ovale malaria, specifically to clear the dormant liver forms of these parasites (hypnozoites) once the parasite has been eliminated from the bloodstream. This requires a 14 day course of primaquine.

Sometimes examiners like to ask you which species cause relapses when treated with chloroquine only. Here’s my memory aid for remembering this tiny piece of information: liVer - viVax & oVale.

That’s all!
-IkaN

Location of synthesis of neurotransmitters mnemonic




It’s hard to remember. It’s easy with pictures!



To sum it all up:

Dopamine - Ventral tegmentum
Serotonin - Raphe nucleus
Norepinephrine - Locus cereleus
GABA - nucleus accumbens
Acetylcholine - Basal nucleus of Meynert

That’s all!
Googliness.
-IkaN

Location of synthesis of neurotransmitters mnemonic

It’s hard to remember. It’s easy with pictures!
To sum it all up:
Dopamine - Ventral tegmentum
Serotonin - Raphe nucleus
Norepinephrine - Locus cereleus
GABA - nucleus accumbens
Acetylcholine - Basal nucleus of Meynert
That’s all!
Googliness.
-IkaN
medicowesome

Which cell secretes what? Gastrointestinal mnemonics

medicowesome:

"pH" for Parietal cells secrete H+ ions.

"PC" for Pepsin is secreted by Chief cells.
(Alternate mnemonic: I think of master chef making food rich in proteins, peptides being degraded by pepsin and that’s how I remember the association that Chief cells secrete Pepsin).

G for G cells & G for Gastrin. (Hah! That was easy!)

S for S cells & S for Secretin! (Medicine is easy!)

You’ve probably heard of the iPhone.. Heard of iCDs? Coz they’re gonna help you remember the rest of the cells secretions- I cells secrete CCK. Delta cells secrete somatostatin. Go ICDS!

That’s all! <3
Wait.. Which cell secretes intrinsic factor? Do you know the IP address of that cell? IP.. Yes, yes. Parietal cells! Intrinsic factor - Parietal cells!

Histology hint: Parietal cells are pink puffy cells. Like a puffy big pink balloon, they are in the upper region of gastric pits. (Compared to chief cells that are in the lower region, have rough endoplasmic reticulum making them blue, and are smaller!)

Hemolytic uremic syndrome mnemonic




Hey everyone!This is not exactly a mnemonic but it puts together the syndrome quite well.

Scarce plateletsLow platelet count (thrombocytopenia) due to sticking of platelets on the damaged blood vessels.Scarred RBCs - You wanna know how I got these scars?The little platelets stuck on the endothelial cells damage and fragment the red blood cells.I like to think of em as scars from moving in the damaged small blood vessels.So scarred RBC&#8217;s in the mnemonic stand for the helmet shaped red blood cells called schistocytes.HUS tells you the organisms that cause it as well -H for eHecU flipped around becomes C for CampylobacterS for ShigellaThat&#8217;s all!Flashcards here.

Hemolytic uremic syndrome mnemonic

Hey everyone!
This is not exactly a mnemonic but it puts together the syndrome quite well.
Scarce platelets
Low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) due to sticking of platelets on the damaged blood vessels.

Scarred RBCs - You wanna know how I got these scars?
The little platelets stuck on the endothelial cells damage and fragment the red blood cells.
I like to think of em as scars from moving in the damaged small blood vessels.
So scarred RBC’s in the mnemonic stand for the helmet shaped red blood cells called schistocytes.

HUS tells you the organisms that cause it as well -
H for eHec
U flipped around becomes C for Campylobacter
S for Shigella

That’s all!

Flashcards here.

Peroneal nerve branches

"Super everter, deep dorsiflexer."

Superficial peroneal nerve (superficial fibular nerve) supplies the fibularis longus (peroneus longus) and fibularis brevis (peroneus brevis). These muscles evert the foot.

The deep fibular nerve (deep peroneal nerve) supplies the tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, fibularis (peroneus) tertius, and extensor hallucis longus (propius). These muscles dorsiflex the foot.

The skin over the greater part of the dorsum of the foot is supplied by the superficial fibular nerve with the exception of the first web space, which is innervated by the deep peroneal nerve.

You can remember most of the superficial stuff (the skin) is supplied by the superficial nerve!

Embryological origin of brain mnemonics

Hello brainy people! Let’s memorize the embryological origins of the encephalon! The what? The brain? Yeah, that’s what we call it!
Disclaimer: I’ve made super lame associations =P

Three primary vesicles:

Forebrain is a pro.
Prosencephalon - future forebrain.

M for midbrain, mesencephalon.
Mesencephalon - future midbrain.

Rhomboid fossa is in the hindbrain.
Rhombencephalon - future hindbrain.

Five secondary vesicles:

You do telepathy with your cerebral hemispheres!
Telencephalon - Cerebral hemispheres.

Diet. Also, your food centres are in hyptothalamus.
Diencephalon - Thalamus, hypothalamus.

M for midbrain, mesencephalon.
Mesencephalon - Midbrain.

Meet me at the pond, bella.
Metencephelon - Pons, cerebellum.

Myelen think spinal cord. What connects spinal cord to the brain?
Myelencephalon - Medulla.

That’s all!
*zombie voice* “Brains! Human brains!”
-IkaN

Difference between primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis mnemonic

Greetings people!
Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).. Because both have the word primary and are associated with the hepatobiliary system, it’s easy to mix em up.

Here’s how I keep them straight -
The middle word is the key:

sclerOsing has an O
O for onion
O looks like a bead

biliAry has an A
A for autoimmune
A for antibodies

Periductal onion skin fibrosis on histology and beaded appearance (both strictures and dilation) on cholangiography is seen in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

Cholangitis and Colitis sound similar and that’s how I make the Ulcerative colitis association with PSC!

Antimitochondrial antibodies are seen in primary biliary cirrhosis. It is autoimmune.

A also reminds me of the Attenuated bile duct epithelium due to destruction of interlobular bile ducts (those that course alongside the hepatic artery) by lymphocyte infiltration (Florid duct lesion).

Since autoimmune diseases are more commonly seen in females, PBC is also common in females.. So the other one, PSC, is seen in males!

Hope you all are doing awesome < 3
-IkaN